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Can Facebook or MySpace Help You Land a Job? The Internet is quickly becoming the vehicle of choice for people looking for a job and for employers looking for people to hire. There are many job sites on the Internet dedicated to matching up employees and employers, and most people turn to the Internet today when they are hunting for a job instead of turning to the classified ads in the local paper. Job hunting websites may all be well and good when you are looking for a job, but what about social networking sites. Everyone knows how popular sites like Facebook and MySpace are online, but can they help you get a job? If you are in the job market, can these sites be your foot in the door, or a one way ticket to the unemployment line? The answer is that there is no easy answer. To know if you can find a job using Facebook or MySpace, you have to know how employers feel about these sites, and employers have mixed feeling about them. Some companies are actively using social networking sites to track down employees that meet their company?s employee profile and have had great success finding workers via social networking sites. Other companies wouldn?t touch these sites as a hiring tool with a ten-foot poll ? in fact, many companies don?t even want you to access these websites from their company computers. The real answer to this question has more to do with exactly what kind of job you are looking for. Are you looking for an executive position at a company? Then stay off of the social networking sites, at least for job hunting (and maybe all together). No company is going to look for its top brass on a social networking site, and you will be wasting your time. However, if you are looking for entry level or hourly wage work, the social networking sites like MySpace and Facebook may be the answer for you. Many hourly wage employers in particular, like fast food restaurant chains and mall stores, use MySpace and Facebook to look for potential employees in their area. If a potential employer sees your profile and thinks you may be a good fit for their company, they will send you an email or an instant message and get the ball rolling. You should also, however, carefully consider the downsides of using social networking sites as a job tool ? and you should carefully consider how and if you use these sites at all if you are in the market for a new job. Most people wouldn?t want their parents to see their social networking site profile, let alone potential employers. If you have rude and off color material, political or religious material, and inappropriate photos of yourself on your profile, a potential employer will be turned off, and you might lose your chance at that job. Most people give up way too much of their privacy when they use these kinds of sites, and your social networking site profile may offer a window into a side of you an employer might not be overly impressed with. Further, you can open yourself up to danger by using these sites to job hunt. If someone approached you in the street and offered you a job, would you accept? Then why would you accept a face value an approach by someone on social networking site? If you do get approached for an interview, never meet anyone in a private place, and do your homework to make sure the facts check out before you go for the interview. One last reality check ? there are over 60 million users on MySpace alone. How will an employer find you in the crowd? MySpace and Facebook may help you in your job hunt, but don?t count on them as your sole avenue into the job market.

Get Free Healthcare Items through the GSK Company Website Ready for the best in free healthcare items? If so, turn to the GSK company website for your share of healthcare freebies. GSK is an acronym for the GlaxoSmithKline Company, which is a major manufacturer of many healthcare and personal care products and items. If you are a fan of this manufacturer, or you simply wish you had access to more affordable health and personal care items, you will be glad to know that this company often runs special promotions. The company's special promotion often includes discount coupons and free samples. Some of their most popular offers include a handy $20 coupon book, as well as free samples of their most popular products, including Tums. What You Have to Do to Gat Access to GSK Special Offers If you are interested in getting access to the best of GSK special offers, here are some hints and tips so that you always get the free personal and health care items you desire. First, you should know that the GSK healthcare company is host to a special site where you can keep track of all their special offers and promotions. The GSK healthcare site is known as HealthySpecials.com. As the name indicates, this is a website dedicated solely to the special promotions that are being ran by the GSK company at any given time. Get to know this website, and a good idea is to bookmark it for easy future reference. When you get to the website, click on any of the deals or promotions. A special details window will open from the login page. If you are having trouble viewing these promotions, make sure that your Internet surfing preferences is set so that you allow pop-up windows. If you are not seeing the details of the promotions, there is a good chance that you have turned on pop-up blocking. Also, you will need an account to access some of the deals and promotions. If you don't have an account, simply click on the setup link and fill out the whole registration form. This should not take long, and it will allow you easier access to all the promotions on the website. Understanding the Availability of GSK Special Promotions Once you become familiar with the special promotions on this website, you will find that the offers will come and go. However, there is nearly always at least one highly desirable promotion, such as a free sample or coupon offer. Most of the availability of these offers will be limited to the United States. Also, make sure you read all the details, as many coupons and offers carry overlapping expiration dates. Avoiding Risks When Choosing GSK Special Offers and Promotions Are there any risks associated with actively seeking GSK offers and promotions? As with most Internet activity, there is always some risk involved in divulging your personal information. Never give out more personal information than you are comfortable giving. However, GSK is a well-known and respected company that offers visitors access to their privacy policy. Their privacy policy states that they will not share your personal information with partner companies or vendors. They ask for a phone number, but it is not required to take advantage of most offers. You will also be asked to enter your date of birth on the initial registration form. For the most part, you will not have to worry about privacy issues when dealing with this well-known and regarded company. However, always make sure that the company or website that you are dealing with offers you a look at their privacy policy. It is a bad sign if the company does not have any sort of privacy policy. As always, use your better judgment when releasing your personal contact information.

Software Copyright Laws Software Copyright Laws Fail to Provide Adequate Protection Software copyright laws are among the most difficult to enforce among the masses. Many companies and corporations are also well known for overlooking these laws, which were designed to protect the makes of software from not earning their worth. Perhaps one of the biggest hitches leading so many software businesses to go out of business is the fact that they have a great deal of difficulty actually enforcing the software copyright laws that are in place and getting the money that is owed them according to the agreements that have been made with those on the using end of the software. Software developers, particularly in the corporate world design software that makes other companies run more efficiently. The software allows these companies to save millions of dollars each year. Software copyright laws protect the interests of the software developers that create these massive programs. These programs are often designed specifically for that one company and are very expensive. The agreement often consists of a certain number of users with the company purchasing more licenses or copies of the software during expansions or paying some sort of royalties for the use of the software. The purchasing companies agree to this and then more often than not fail to honor that agreement. The agreement is what allows this company to use that software, this agreement is what allows that permission. When companies aren't living up to their end of this agreement they are not only guilty of breaching that agreement but also of breaking software copyright laws. The trouble always lies in proving that they are not honoring the contract and the extent and duration of the breach. Some of the ways that companies will argue in defense of them not paying the royalties, additional fees, purchasing additional software, etc. is that they upgraded computers and reused the old software (they did actually purchase the rights to use the original software and by doing so feel that they have broken no software copyright laws) the problem lies in the fact that adding ten new computers and placing the software on those should mean that you remove it from or get rid of 10 old computers. This is rarely how it works. So now they've basically stolen ten copies of software that can be well worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. Multiply this by 10, 20, or 100 companies trying this or worse each year and the offending companies are costing software developers millions of dollars in profits. This is when software copyright laws are not as far reaching in their scope as they really need to be. Software copyright laws exist to protect the software companies from this type of abuse and misuse, however, the hands of the companies are almost unilaterally tied when it comes to proving that software copyright laws have been broken in court. There are always exceptions to every rule. In this case big business software developers that abuse the software copyright laws to the point of breaking make the exceptions rather than miserly consumers that do not wish to pay for the products they are consuming. The big boys are able to do this by offering licenses for their software and claiming that these laws do not apply to their situation because they are not actually selling the software only 'renting' out permission for people or companies to 'use' that software. The true irony is that these practices began as a response to the corporate irresponsibility mentioned above. It's amazing that the very software copyright laws that were created to protect these companies can't protect their consumers from the greed of the developing companies.